Celebrate the Whippet Breed

M.B. Arthur Scrapbook Page Two

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Painting by Mary Beth Arthur


HUMBLE ACRE MUSKRAT RAMBLE

(HANDLED HERE BY JOE GREGORY)
WHELPED APRIL 30, 1964

BREEDER: HUMBLE ACRE KENNEL OWNER: BETTYE KIRKSEY SCOTT

SIRE: CH. LYSANDER OF BRISKWAYS DAM: STONEY MEADOWS WINNIE

M. R. IS A LOVELY DEEP FAWN, BEAUTIFULLY MOVING LITTLE "DEER". SHE DISPLAYS PERFECT BAL ­ ANCE AND SYMMETRY IN THE RING. JUST STARTING OUT WITH JOE GREGORY, SHE WON A 3 POINT MAJOR UNDER MRS. ALBERT VAN COURT AT NEW ORLEANS.

HUMBLE ACRE MEADOW LARK

(HANDLED HERE BY DON COOPER)
WHELPED APRIL 30, 1964

BREEDER: HUMBLE ACRE KENNEL OWNER: BETTYE KIRKSEY SCOTT

SIRE: CH. LYSANDER OF BRISKWAYS DAM: STONEY MEADOWS WINNIE

MEADOW LARK TOOK A 5 POINT MAJOR IN FT. WORTH UNDER PLUMMER AND THE NEXT DAY 4 POINTS UNDER FRANK P. MILLER, B. O. W. GOING TO HER KENNEL MATE, WHIPOO'S CHEESTA. A LOVELY MOVER, EXQUISITE OUTLINE, MEADOW LARK LACKS ONLY 2 POINTS TO FINISH HER CHAMPIONSHIP. HER WINS:

JACKSONVILLE FLA.

JAN. 17,

1965,

JUDGE,

FRANK DAVIS, B. 0. B.

PALM BEACH , FLA.

JAN. 19,

1965,

JUDGE,

ALBERT VAN COURT , B. W.

ST. PETERSBURG , FLA.

JAN. 24,

1965,

JUDGE,

JOHN CUNEO, B. 0. S., 2 POINTS

LONGVIEW , TEXAS

MAR. 25,

1965,

JUDGE,

MAURICE BAKER, B. 0. S. 2 POINTS

FT. WORTH , TEXAS

MAR. 27,

1965,

JUDGE,

J. A. PLUMMER, B. 0. S., 5 POINTS

DALLAS , TEXAS

MAR. 28,

1965,

JUDGE,

FRANK MILLER, B. 0. S., 4 POINTS


HOLLYPARK BABY DOLL OF URRAY' (17TH DEC 1963)

B. C. LADIES KENNEL CLUB SHOW. VANCOUVER B. C. 23RD. MAY 1965.

BOB (8 ENTERED INCLUDING TWO SPECIALS) AND 1ST HOUND GROUP. (40 TOTAL HOUND ENTRY)

JUDGE - MRS. EDNA T. JOEL, ISLINGTON, ONTARIO, CANADA.

SHOWN RECEIVING 1ST HOUND GROUP AWARD. FINISHED CANADIAN CHAMPIONSHIP SAME DAY.
HANDLED BY MARK WEBSTER. MR. OSWALD BALSHAW PRESENTING TROPHY.


CHAMPION SAN SABAS SNEDLEY SNEDLEY

BREEDER: HUMBLE ACRE KENNEL OWNER: BETTYE KIRKS, SCOTT

SIRE: CH. LYSANDER OF BRISKWAYS DAM: CH. WHIPOO'S TAR HEEL

THOUGH INTRODUCED TO THE SHOW RING LATER THAN SWIFTY, HIS LITTER SISTER. SNEDLEY IS MAKING QUITE A NAME FOR HIMSELF IN THE GROUPS. HANDLED EXCLUSIVELY BY FRANK SABELLA, SNEDLEY AND HIS HANDLER ARE SO BEAUTIFULLY MATCHED THAT THEY PROJECT A BEAUTIFUL. SEEMINGLY EFFORTLESS, NATURAL APPEARANCE IN THE SHOW RING. A LITTLE DEER, HE DISPLAYS GREAT BEAUTY IN TRUE WHIPPET MOVEMENT AND SYMMETRY. WATCH FOR THE.

DOGPATCH
P. O. BOX 790
HARLINGEN , TEXAS


Ch. Briarwyns Believe It Or Not will be bred for her first litter


DOG OF THE WEEK

Run rabbit run, because these two fast backs are whippets—among the fastest dogs alive—yet dignified, gentle pets.

Ivan and Corker, 6 month old males, can be yours for $10 each at the Wisconsin Humane society, 4151 N. Humboldt av.


Left is Judge Mr. Stanley Dangerfield, and right is Mr. E. Griffiths


CH. PENNYWORTH BLUE IRIS, Whippet, owned by Pennyworth Kls, Hampton Bays, L. I., BIS at
South Shore under Mrs. E. X. Sturdee, Robert
Forsyth handling; Justin Mills, club pres.—Brown


CHAMPION HUMBLE ACRE SIDE BET

(HANDLED HERE BY JOE GREGORY W.D. LOUISIANA K.C., APRIL 10. 1965. JUDGE. MRS. ALBERT E. VAN COURT.)
WHELPED JUNE 7. 1969

BREEDER: HUMBLE ACRE KENNEL OWNER: BETTYE KIRKSET SCOTT

SIRE: CH. LYSANDER OF BRISKWAYS DAM: CH. WHIPOO'S TAR HEEL

SIDE BET. THE LITTER MATE OF OUR POKEY SLOW. TOOK A 3 POINT MAJOR UNDER ALVA ROSENBURG GOING OVER SPECIALS, THE FIRST TIME SHOWN, AT SIX MONTHS OF AGE, HANDLED AY EUGENE JACOBS. SHOWN SPARINGLY. SIDE BET FINISHED AT NEW ORLEANS UNDER JUDGE MRS. ALBERT VAN COURT, A 3 POINT MAJOR AND B. O. TO OUR SWIFTY. SIDE BET IS WITH JOE GREGORY.

DOGPATCH
P. O. BOX 790
HARLINGEN , TEXAS


Whippets, 1965

by Doris S. Wear

Enterprise , Cecilton, Md.

THE PAST YEAR has been one of unprecedented growth of interest in the Whippet. This proves what one top dog can do for a breed when it is well managed, promoted and campaigned. The famous "Ricky" (Ch. Courtenay Fleetfoot of Pennyworth), his popular owners, Peggy and Brad Newcombe and his handler, Bob Forsyth, have certainly put Whippets "on the map" in the best possible way! By showing fearlessly from Coast to Coast, they have made the public aware of the Whippet as an outstanding show breed of easy preparation and trainability, a breed of natural beauty, a good specimen of which, can hold its own in the keenest best-in-show competition.

Interest in the breed, sparked by "Ricky's" big winning, seems to have "rubbed off" on the right kind of people—those who seriously wish to own high class show and breeding stock. This is as it should be and, fortunately, the very nature and appearance of our breed precludes the "run of the mill" popularity that has affected and afflicted some of the other breeds that have had a best in show at Westminster.

So far, so good. The Whippet has not yet, praise be, become a "status symbol." Let us keep it that way. We can take pride that, to date, one does not see columns of "Whippet Puppies For Sale" in the advertising sections of daily newspapers; nor are Whippets listed among breeds offered by pet shops and "dog farms: Heaven forbid that this should ever happen!

The Running Hound

Now let us take a look at the breed as we see it today. I venture to guess that if all the people who are currently licensed to judge Whippets were asked the question: "What do you consider the most common fault in the breed today?"—nine out of ten would answer, "Bad movement."

The next question, an obvious corollary, would be: "What causes bad movement?" There are as many answers to this one as there are dogs which move badly. Excluding lack of proper conditioning (correct feeding and exercise) that can cause bad movement i n the best of dogs, and lack of ring training, the most basic cause of faulty movement is poor conformational balance; i.e., the lack of proper relationship of the different anatomical parts, one to the other.

On the surface, this is fairly elementary and a reasonably trained eye can tell at a glance, on viewing a ring full of Whippets standing still, which ones will not—because they simply cannot—due to a plainly visible skeleton imbalance, move correctly. The real "stumper" comes with the Whippet which when standing looks close to perfection but, alas and alack, "falls apart " when asked to move!

The cause for this? Again, lack of balance, but this time in the muscular make-up of the dog and this is a less understood but very integral and important part of the Whippet's anatomy. The most beautiful skeletal structure is useless unless held together by strong ligaments and made functional by proper musculature.

The Whippet, we must always bear in mind, is a running hound. His muscles must be hard and firm but at the same time they must have a strong degree of elasticity. Just as unsightly and even less functional than the loose, soft-muscled Whippet, is the rigid, muscle-bound hound which moves with no reach in front, no flexibility of loin, and no rear drive because his muscles are all tied up in hard knots!

Proper Gait and Conditioning

Correct musculature is something that must be bred, as well as a proper skeletal frame. No amount of free running or road work—both of which are necessary to bring a Whippet to the peak of his potential—will sufficiently harden and tighten a too soft, loosely muscled hound; nor will "boxing," massage, or any. other conditioning trick limber up or loosen an over-muscled one.

One of the best ways to test the true balance of this running hound is to view him from the side as he moves. Whereas the test of moving a dog straight away from, and back to the viewer, serves to show sound gait, or deviations there from (i.e., crossing, paddling in front—cow or bowed hocks, etc., in the rear), seeing a dog move from the side is the best way to understand why he moves as he does coming and going. Furthermore, and most important, it shows whether the dog in question moves with a gait typical of that breed, in this case, the Whippet.

Our standard states that the Whippet's gait should be "low, free-moving and smooth" and further says that, "a short. mincing gait with high knee action should be severely penalized." Yet, we still, all too frequently, see Whippets in the ring which, though sound in gait coming and going, look like over­ grown Italian Greyhounds when seen moving in profile!

The latter breed's Standard calls for "action—high stepping and free." Perusal of the two standards quickly points up structural differences that account for two different types of gait in these breeds. New breeders and judges please take note!

The antithesis of the above fault is the exaggeration of the "low, free-moving and smooth" gait. Many people, including some judges, are guilty of misinterpreting the Standard by thinking that a low, almost slinky, cat­ like gait is desirable for the Whippet. That this is wrong can be understood when it is recalled that Whippets are a galloping breed —not one that does its work at the trot. Therefore, they should travel low and freely over the ground but not give the appearance of moving along the ground! As is always true, this exaggerated, typically low, almost stealthy gait is caused by faulty structure—in this case, short shoulder blades, low withers and a body flat-backed and too long in relation to length of leg. This type of Whippet can be "stacked" by a clever handler to appear to have correct conformation; and he may often be quite true in his movement going and coming, but again, it is only by seeing him move in profile that his undesirable outline and lack of correct breed type readily become apparent.

So, to the many new owners and would-be breeders of top class Whippets, I say, do not try to evaluate your show and breeding prospects by seeing him "set up" in show pose only. See him moving, not merely away from and back to you, but examine him most carefully of all from the side as he moves. It is this view of your Whippet that will give you most clearly an idea of his true worth.

Breeding — Balance

In closing, I will pass on two pieces of advice given to me by two eminent dog men; I have found both well worth remembering in my effort to evaluate and breed good Whippets. The first, from an all-round judge in whose ring I was apprenticing for my Whippet license. He said in effect, "Balance, balance; remember—always go for balance. Do not fall for one particular feature, however good it may be if it spoils balance. Choose a dog a bit too straight at both ends over a dog with a superlative rear and a too straight or faulty front, or vice versa. The first, though not ideal, will move better and be a better whole dog than the latter."

The second piece of advice I have found through the years to be so sound came from another all-rounder who had also been a breeder. He told me, "Never try to correct a fault by breeding to the opposite extreme. For example, do not breed an over- or under-sized hitch to a stud dog of the opposite extreme. Breed to a dog of correct size, preferably one with parents of correct size; then breed the bitches from that mating, again to a dog of correct size. In Whippets, a flat-backed bitch should never be bred to a wheel-backed dog, but to a stud of the most perfectly correct conformation. particularly excelling in top-line, which you can find."

In other words, he was telling me that the old saw that says, "Two wrongs do not make a right" applies to breeding dogs. This seems such an obvious truth, it is amazing how many tyro dog breeders—and I was one of them— try to build Rome in a day by breeding extreme to extreme. It just won't work!


"Barney" Topping Eastern Groups .. .

CH. GREENBRAE BARN DANCE, topnotch young English import Whippet, pictured in the first four of six Groups he has won—five of them within the last three months. He has fol­ lowed upon the wins shown above with GRls at Raleigh, N. C. and Chester Valley, Pa. shows. "Barney" is not yet three years old. He is owned by Mrs. Clare C. Hodge, 517 Hill brook Rd., Bryn Mawr, Pa. , and is regularly handled by Frank and Dorothy Hardy.


WHIPPET RIGHTS AND WRONGS FROM 1964

A good head and neck; correctly folded ear; eye rim could be darker. Good, dark eye rim; but note Roman nose; short, thick neck—compare. Wrong: Flying ears; short, thick neck; thick skull; short muzzle. Excellent bite; note dark eye rim;
correct pigment of nose, lips.

Excellent front, deep brisket; good bone, straight. Poor; compare shallow brisket to left; sullen expression. Front too wide; elbows turn out; thin, flat, open feet. Chest too narrow here (legs too close); poor feet. Weak pasterns (down on pasterns); flat feet - poor.

Ring tail poor, carried too high; weak hindquarters. Correct rear; legs long, muscular, straight; good tail. Correct tail should reach hip when drawn through legs. Cowhocked (hocks turn in); tail too thick - compare. Tail too short; croup too steep; poor stifle angulation.

A well-balanced Whippet; note well-developed muscles, good bone; stifle and hock angulation: depth of brisket; neck long, well-arched; wellknuckled-up paws: good head; compare to specimens at right: #2 dog has flat feet and flat back, shallow brisket, straight shoulder, is "down on pasterns," has poor ear carriage; #3 dog is poorly balanced, has
short, thick neck, steep croup; note heavy ("loaded") shoulder at far right; elbows turn out, barrel-chested, undesirable. The color of a Whippet is immaterial but the coat should be close, smooth and firm in texture.

—All photographs by Evelyn Shafer


Whipoo Obedience Whippets

WHIPOO'S SILKEN ELEGANCE. CD. STEP A LONG LATE SPEED, CD: and BROWN'S WHITE HOPE, CD, trained and handled by Mrs. E. L. Jacobs: owners, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene L. Jacobs.

Whippets

by Mrs. William Potter Wear

WHY OWN a Whippet? That question might be asked of a dozen different Whippet owners and as many different answers be received, none of them contradicting the others but all of them adding up to a composite picture of an ideal breed of dog, a breed which to the Whippet fraternity, has more of the joys and less of the disadvantages of dog ownership than can be found in any other breed.

First, the pure appeal of their looks. The clean-cut flowing lines of a first-rate specimen of the breed cannot fail to impress. Here is symmetry and balance and the essence of the word, "quality." One does not have to train one's eye to appreciate the beauty of a good Whippet; it is there in all its lovely simplicity, clear to see.

Whippets come in all colors and various combinations to suit the most exacting tastes, and inside these beautiful many-hued bodies live personalities whose only common trait is their "differentness," one from the other! Indeed, in the fact that each individual is a "character" lies one of the main fascinations of this breed. Here is a breed difficult to write about because it is hard to generalize; it must be borne in mind that any generalization of Whippets is apt to have more than the usual number of "exceptions that prove the rule."

Whippets do not "sell themselves" and one must go more than halfway to meet and to know them. As a rule they are reserved with strangers both at home and in public and particularly at shows, their aversion to crowds causes them to be overlooked by the public. Alas, occasionally is this true in the ring also, especially in the group judging where showmanship is a definite requisite. Happy indeed is the Whippet owner who has a top dog which is also a "ham!" Nevertheless, they are a most satisfactory show dog because of the ease of preparation, their quiet demeanor on the bench, and their extreme "eye-appeal."

Even though Whippets are considered a "minority" breed they constitute a definite best-in-show threat when represented by a good specimen and that is more than can be said for some of the lesser known breeds.

While we are on the subject of the show aspect of Whippets there are a couple of things that I, speaking purely for myself, would like to bring to the attention of judges. One is that if the standard is studied, it will be seen that color is definitely stated to be "immaterial." I feel that there is a decided tendency on the part of some judges, particularly when it comes to the group and best in show, to favor the "flash" colors and to over­look a solid colored dog. I know some breed

ers feel that this is so to such an extent that they will not retain a solid colored dog for showing, feeling that he is "beaten before he starts." Let us have more impartiality on color.

Too, I wish more attention were paid to movement. There seems to be some confusion about how a Whippet should move, not whether they should plait in front and knock behind—there is no breed that should do that, although it often gets by judges—but whether or not they should move with a high, prancing, hackney gait. The answer of course, is a definite and emphatic "No!" If a judge is in doubt, his common sense should say, "This is a running dog; it is meant to cover ground," and resolve the answer.

Not long ago I received a letter from a newcomer to the breed who has a nice, smooth, sound-moving little bitch which she was showing against a bitch of similar type but which moved with high prancing action. The "hackney pony" was put up because, quote the judge, "the other bitch moved with more style." What nonsense, and yet I believe there are all too many judges who would have done it the same way, for the same reason. These two items, color and movement are, I think, the two main obstacles to be cleared up in the judging of Whippets.

Now let us consider breeding. Having bought and shown your first dog which, assuming you have acquired a nice example of the breed, you have shown with enough success to inspire you to go on, you now wish to breed. What could be a more natural transition? And again where could one find an easier breed to start raising? (Here we go generalizing again, but this time the rule is proved by fewer exceptions.) Whippets are notoriously easy whelpers and few and far between are the cases of trouble in this line. The bitches are good mothers and present no problems in the rearing of their young; so with a minimum of worry, fuss and bother you have a litter of sound, healthy puppies with nothing to do to them but cut their dewclaws about the fifth day. Just think, no tails to be cut, no ears to be cropped and, when they are older, no coat to be clipped, stripped, plucked or brushed by the hour.

True, this breed requires patience, it is not a "hurry up" breed. Bitches generally mature late, very rarely coming in season under a year old, the average, speaking from my own experience, being around 16 to 18 months of age. From then on they differ in regularity, some coming in every 6 months like clock work, others only at 8 or 10-month intervals. The puppies develop slowly also, being at their most gangling, awkward stage when dogs of other breeds are becoming champions and winning groups! However this is but a slight drawback and the ultimate product is worth the waiting for.

Finally, what about Whippets as "people?" This is a most important thing about any breed. Some Whippets are extroverts, more are introverts, some have a heavenly sense of humor, others are "stuffed shirts" to the point of being comical. There are "Peck's bad boys," some little models of decorum as well as the sissies, the bullies and the live-and-let-live" types.

Broadly speaking, there is one characteristic that is typical—a very real concern for their own comfort! This involves the softest chair, the warmest spot by the fire, at least three -quarters of your bed or the coolest spot in the house come Summer! Their discomfiture, if deprived of these luxuries, which to them are inalienable rights, is manifested in many ways, most of them comical, some of them heart ­ rending, but either way the Whippet always wins, to the complete satisfaction of both dog and owner! In the kennel a Whippet will thrive much better if given those two requisites for this breed, warmth and a soft bed. However they are not delicate as their "shivering" under cold weather conditions sometimes leads people to believe. They do not catch cold easily but they do feel the cold intensely, except when exercising strenuously.

Whippets are an ideal companion dog for either town or country because of their moderate size and smooth coats, and because within the varying range of personalities there always can be found one to suit. They can he perfect pets for boys and girls but are not recommended for small children to maul and pull about as are some of the larger, more phlegmatic breeds. Whippets are thin-skinned and are physically as well as emotionally sensitive. They simply cannot take the beating that is sometimes the lot of the family pet. Neither are they "hero dogs." I have never heard of one jumping into a lake to save someone, but neither have I ever heard of one getting itself and its breed into the trouble and bad publicity that one hears about in representatives of some of the more "noble" breeds. In short, they are much like us humans, possessing many of our own short ­comings which only makes them all the more lovable. Jealous, yes—"This is MY person, she can't love you too;" selfish, yes—"This is MY chair, would you please go sit in that nice hard one over there?" Egotistic, yes — "What WOULD they do without me," which last is just about right for, as a kennelman friend of mine once said, "The more I see of other breeds, the better I like Whippets!"


Westminster's Winner-
a Whippet

At the moment of victory Ricky's handler, Bob Forsyth, sweeps him off the floor in triumph while the losing boxer jumps in the excitement and the poodle ignores the fuss. A
staunch trouper, Ricky posed beside his cup (left) for 40 minutes. Then outfitted against the cold, he was carried off (above) by his owner, Mrs. Margaret Newcombe, to her hotel room where he finally relaxed (below), keeping a languid, weary eye on his prize .

The whippet did it, the one who wound up the color gallery of top show dogs in LIFE in the issue before last (Feb. 7). Breaking all precedent at the Westminster Ken­nel Club show in New York last week, Ch. Courtenay Fleetfoot of Pennyworth high-stepped over all competition to win Best in Show.

First Ricky-as he is called around the kennels-beat 18 dogs of his own breed. Next he went on to beat 19 other best-of-breeds in the hound group, including a top-winning greyhound which until recently had been top hound of the country. Then he came to the finals against five other best-of-breeds. Among them were two other dogs (above) of LIFE'S gallery. The ebullient boxer, Treceder's Painted Lady, has won more top show ribbons than any other dog around and was given the best chance. The elegant miniature poodle, Tedwin's Top Billing, was close behind. And an engaging Maltese momentarily caught the fancy of the gallery. But Ricky never made a wrong move. He posed with artful grace, trotted up and down in feathery rhythm. Many other breeds at a show "ask for it"-put on a display of personality to help win. But Ricky was a cool, aloof performer, seemingly so sure of himself that he hardly had to ask. The judge barely hesitated in making Ricky the first whippet ever to win the highest of all show dog awards.


WHIPPET REIGNS AS CANINE KING

Champion Courtenay Fleetfoot of Pennyworth, a whippet, is posed by its handler, Robert Forsyth, after winning the title of best in show in the 88th annual Westminster Kennel Club dog show in New York's Madison Square Garden . The dog is owned by Margaret P. Newcombe, of Newington. N. H.

TIME, FEBRUARY 21, 1964

PETS

Man's Best Friend ... of the Moment

Ricky Tic Tac, sometimes known as Champion Courtenay Fleetfoot of Pennyworth, pranced to immortality in Manhattan's Madison Square Garden last week as best dog in the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Ricky is a whippet, and the first of his breed ever to win the putative status of America's top dog.*

There are only 399 whippets registered in the U.S., and the breed ranks 58th in the roster of favorite U.S. dogs —well behind the first place poodles (147,055), and even behind such esoteric canines as Vizslas (589), schip­perkes (937) and shonden (989).

And this, plus Ricky's triumph, puts whippets in the running for In dog.

* And the second of category: hound. Only other hound to win best dog at Westminster since the club began the category in 1907 was an Afghan: Shirkan of Grandeur in 1957


PENNYWORTH KENNELS

Whippets

 

ENG. CH. COURTENAY FLEETFOOT

English import

Best in Hound Group in his American debut at Worcester, Dec. 18, 1962—a week after his importation here. In England, BOB and Dog C.C. at Northern Co. Whippet Club, winner Hound Group at Blackpool, and of 7 C.C.'s.

 

CH. PAGEANT OF ALLWAYS

English import

WD 8 times in 8 shows enroute to championship, going on to 4 BOBs, 1 GR2, and 1 GR4.

Owner, MRS. MARGARET P. NEWCOMBE
Little Bay Rd., Newington, N. H. Phone, Area Code 603—GE 6.7512


From POPULAR DOGS December 1955

The Whippet

THE WHIPPET has become synonymous with speed justly so. For it is the fastest of domesticated animals at its size, capable of up to 35 miles an hour in a stretch run. The Whippet was evolved from the English Greyhound about a hundred years ago In England, he was originally used for coursing rabbits. He is, in effect, a miniature Greyhound — slim, rounded over the loin, and extremely tucked up in the waist.

Along with the Greyhound, the Whippet has become a favor ite of the dog racing sport which is growing increasingly popular here and in England.

The slim appearance of the Whippet is deceiving for he is actually a very sturdy dog. He is not fully a pp reciated for his ideal adaptability as a dog for the city or suburban home. His size is just right for most homes. Beautiful in appearance, and gracefully smooth in action, he is a constant treat to the eyes. He is quiet and calm with children, yet ever alert as a watchdog

ENG. and AM. CH. WINGEDFOOT FIELDSPRING BRYONY

Winner of three Hound Groups and many Group placements this year.
Best of Breed and fourth in Group, Westminster, 1955.

Puppies and Grown Stock for Sale

PENNYWORTH KENNELS

Owner: MARGARET P. RITCHIE (formerty Margaret P. Raynor)
Box 14, HAMPTON RAYS, LONG ISLAND , N. Y. Tel. Hampton Bays 2-0750

Handler, Robert Forsyth


CH. PENNYWORTH APRIL FOOL PICTURED BB AT CENTRAL IOWA KC ON OCT 4, 1964
UNDER JUDGE HOLLIS WILSON
AT KEOMAH KC THE PRECEDING DAY, AGAIN BB UNDER MR. MAURICE BAKER AND
AWARDED GR2 BY MR. ROBERT WATERS

"APRIL" IS THE DAM OF 3 CHAMPIONS AND CONTINUES HER WINNING WAYS!

OWNER & HANDLER: MRS, EMALIE EWING, WINGS KENNEL, RUTLEDGE, MO .


 
CH. BADGEWOOD SEWICKLEY   BADGEWOOD COLORADO
By Ch Ladiesfield Topaz

BADGEWOOD MOON RIVER

 

BADGEWOOD BELLE STAR

(by Ch Wingedfoot Marks man of Allways)

  BADGEWOOD COPPER PENNY
(by USA Ch Meander Metallurgist ex Caniston Carlotta of Ivardon)

BADGEWOOD CALAMITY JANE (by Ch Wingedfoot Marksman of Allways)

CH. BADGEWOOD SEWICKLEY AND HER SISTER BADGEWOOD MARTHA JANE


KOBOLD FORMULA I, WHIPPET, came from the classes to win BiS at the Dan Emmett KC show,
under J. William L. Kendrick.. "Kobold" was handled by his owner, John Berger. Betsy Thomas, Show
presented trophy. (Norton photo)


WINNERS AT AMERICAN WHIPPET Club Specialty 1960, Penllyn, Pa. last Fall. Ch. Stoney Meadows Sprint, left, won BB, handled by owner Calvin G. Perry. Right, STONEY Meadows Golden Apple, handled by owner, Mrs. W. P. Wear; Judge Mrs. Winifred Heckmann. Second from right, Donald Hostetter, club president (Evelyn Shafer photo).


WHITE ACRES CAROLS FANCY
WHELPED APRIL 6, 1962
WHITE ACRES SAGE
WHELPED OCTOBER 16, 1962

SIRE

PENNYWORTH TUMBLEWEED

SAGE - Highest scoring Whippet, Santa Barbara Racing Meet, held in conjunction with the Santa Barbaro K. C. Show.

FANCY - Highest scoring Whippet Bitch, Santa Barbaro Racing Meet, held in conjunction with the Santa Barbara K. C. show

CAROL BAUMGARTNER
10703 59th Ave. E. Puyallup, Washington
LES BABBITT
5802 Beverley Ave. N.E.
Tacoma 22. Washington

STONEY MEADOWS

Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen

Home of:

CH. STONEY MEADOWS FAIRY TALE

CH. STONEY MEADOWS MODEL

CH. STONEY MEADOWS SNOW QUEEN

CH. STONEY MEADOWS GOLDEN APPLE

CH. STONEY MEADOWS TITANIA

* CH. STONEY MEADOWS WINSTON

* CH. STONEY MEADOWS RED FOX

* CH. STONEY MEADOWS MOONSHINE

CH. STONEY MEADOWS RED VIXEN

CH. STONEY MEADOWS QUEEN'S GIFT

CH. MEANDER WET PAINT (bred by Meander Kls.)

At stud to approved bitches.

Breeders of:

CH. EYELAND STONEY MEADOWS TOST (Mr. and Mrs. Ralph G. Eyles)

CH. STONEY MEADOWS MOONLIGHT (Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graham)

CH. GLENHAVEN'S WILDWIND (Mrs. Stanley Pimble)

CAN. & AM. CH. STONEY MEADOWS SPRINT (Calvin Perry)

CH. STONEY MEADOWS ICE FOLLY (Mr. and Mrs. Ralph G. Eyles)

CH. STONEY MEADOWS LADY SKIPPER (Mrs. Stanley Pimble)

CH. PENNYWORTH APRIL FOOL (Pennyworth Kennels)

CH. STONEY MEADOWS BEDTIME STORY (Mr. and Mrs. Ralph G. Eyles)

MR. and MRS. W. P. WEAR
New address: "Enterprise"— CECILTON, MD. — Phone 301-275-6191


SEVEN LEAGUE WHIPPETS

 

CH. SEVEN LEAGUE SONGBIRD

In a short time we have bred:

CH. SEVEN LEAGUE SADDLER, who finished from the Junior Puppy class, his son, CH. SEVEN LEAGUE SUNDAY BEST, who finished with but one defeat in the breed and has a Group; and CH. SEVEN LEAGUE SONGBIRD, who was BOW at the AWC Specialty, and was BOB at the Garden her first time out as a Special. Quality puppies and breeding stock occasionally for sale

MR. and MRS. D R. MOTCH

"Cismont Manor" Keswick , Va. Tel. Charlottesville 295-4223



Puppies October 1963


CH. ROANBAR SON OF CASHALONG,

Whippet, owned by John R. Hutchins and handled by Keith Wait, won BiS at the Waterloo KC show under judge Dr. Frank P. Miller. Dr. Jean LePoidivin, club pres. with trophy. Roanbar also won BIS at the Mason City KC show the previous day under judge Dr. Rex B. Foster. (Ritter photo)



CH. HOLLYPARK HIGHLAND FLING

BEST OF BREED (ENTRY OF 28) FOURTH IN GROUP

SUN MAID KENNEL CLUB

FRESNO , CALIFORNIA JUDGE: MR. E. C. GAMBLE

("WHITE FANG" ALSO CAME IN THIRD IN THE FINALS IN RACING THE SAME DAY AND FASTEST ADULT DOG THE NEXT WEEK END AT SACRAMENTO)

"FANG" IS PROUDLY OWNED BY: ELIZABETH “LIZ” SCOTT AND DOROTHEA C. FRAMES


Rollo

CH. EYLELAND CINNAMON ROLL

Whelped March 1, 1960
Sire: Stoney Meadows Epic Dam: Ch. Eyleland Stoney Meadows Tost

RECORD: Finished in four consecutive shows (4, 1, 5, 5) including WD New England Specialty, Judge: Donald P. Hostetter.

Runner up (to Eyleland Peppermint Boy) Chicago International and Pennlyn Races 1961.

Top American Racing Whippet 1962 and 1963.

SIRE OF: Eyleland Brown Betty, owned by Windholme Kennels, BEST OF BREED AWC Specialty, 1963.

Ch. Eyleland Cinnamon Toast, owned by John H. Berger.

Eyleland Crepe Suzette, 14 points, owned by Mr. and Mrs. V. A. Renner. Ch. Eyleland Crescendo, owned by Paul Sykes.

Ch. Ey!eland Pianissimo, owned by Paul Sykes.

Kobold Formula I, BEST IN SHOW Central Ohio KC, Gambier, Ohio , bred and owned by John H. Berger.

EYLELAND KENNELS ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS